Walking Tours in the Black Mountains

THE BLACK MOUNTAINS - GRADE (A)

'TABLE MOUNTAIN AND THE SUGAR LOAF'

Distance: 6. 5 miles. Ascent: 546 metres.
£43 per person if 2 participants, click here for full price information and how to book
Includes a picnic lunch and expert guiding by a Mountain Leader and Geologist
Pick up and return from Abergavenny station or your local accommodation (depending on location)

This walk in fact 2 walks, that climb the 2 most iconic peaks in the southern Black Mountains.  We climb the Sugar Loaf in the morning, with a picnic lunch by the River Usk, and then climb Table Mountain in the afternoon.

The summit of the Sugarloaf with the Skirrid Mountain visible in the background
The view of the Sugarloaf from Table Mountain
Table Mountain
The distinctive flat topped summit of Table Mountain (seen from Mynydd Llangattock)
Looking down on Table Mountain from the extension route up to Pen Cerrig-calc

Route

Part 1

Distance: 3 miles. Ascent: 300 metres

The Sugar Loaf or Mynydd Pen-y-fal in Welsh, is one of the most distinctive and popular peaks in the National Park. Its rugged cone-shaped summit can be seen from many miles around and it is an easy peak to climb. It's quiet distinct from the rest of the Black Mountains, due to the Neath Valley Disturbance Fault that passes between it and the rest of the Black Mountains. The views from the top of the Sugar Loaf are stunning. Most of the National Park can be seen, as can the Bristol Channel, Malvern Hills and Cotswolds.

Part 2

Distance: 3.5 miles. Ascent: 246 metres.

It is easy to see how Crug Hywel, with its distinctive flat top, gets ts nickname of Table Mountain. The 451m summit is crowned by an Iron Age Fort with a superb viewpoint. We climb to the mountain via an enclosed wooded valley then approach the summit via open moorland paths. The return walk is on footpaths through fields.

Extension

If there is time and you have the stamina it is possible to extend the walk by a further 2 miles  and  a further 268m of ascent by climbing to the peak of Pen Cerrig-Calc after Table Mountain. This would make this walk a Grade (B) walk. The extension is well worth due due to the interesting geology. There is Carboniferous limestone and millstone grit on the summit, the only occurrence of Carboniferous rocks in the Black Mountains.

The Black Mountains - Grade (b)

'Waun Fach'Distance: 9.1 miles, Ascent: 510m

£43 per person if 2 participants, click here for full price information and how to book
Includes a picnic lunch and expert guiding by a Mountain Leader and Geologist
Pick up and return from Abergavenny station or your local accommodation (depending on location)
Your guide James Cresswell at Dinas Castle
Your guide James Cresswell at Castell Dinas (Dinas Castle)
The view down the Rhiangoll from Dinas Castle
The view down the Rhiangoll from Castell Dinas (Dinas Castle)

Route

A superb walk that ascends Waun Fach, the highest mountain in the Black Mountains, and has stunning panoramic views. The descent down Y Grib, also known as the Dragon's Back , leads to Castell Dinas which is a ruined Norman castle, the highest in Wales built on top of an Iron aged fort. The castle has commanding views down the Rhiangoll Valley.

The Black Mountains - Grade (c)

'Vale of Ewyas'Distance: 11.4 miles, Ascent: 929m

£44 per person if 2 participants, click here for full price information and how to book
Includes a picnic lunch and expert guiding by a Mountain Leader and Geologist
Pick up and return from Abergavenny station or your local accommodation (depending on location)
Llanthony Priory
Llanthony Priory
Capel-y-Ffin
Capel-y-Ffin

Route

A classic route that takes in two ridges and the beautfiul Vale of Ewyas. The walk starts at the impressive Llanthony Priory and climbs up to Offa's Dyke, the boundary between England and Wales. It then follows the ridge, descending to the Vision Farm which featured in the novel 'On the Black Hill'. The route then leads through Capel-y-Ffin which is home to the smallest church in Wales. The route then climbs up to the top of the Bal Mawr ridge and continues south along that before descending back into Llanthony.

When booking these tours please also read our Weather page, because they can be affected by bad weather.